A Word About BGP Bogons Filtering

BGP4 filtering is important, but how can you keep track of the prefixes and do active filtering on them?

It has been a while since my last blog post now, it’s partly because I have been (honestly) pretty lazy lately, yes, I have been trying to cool down on all my working because I started to get some problems with keeping track of my own feelings.
..and also because I have been trying to spend a little more time with the girl that actually can stand living with such a busy internet lunatic, we went to see the Norwegian setup of the musical Grease and also a Norwegian talk show named Senkveld, and along with all the xmas preparations and that it has been kind of hectic, but very very nice.
While I am still talking freely here, why is it that while I can see people reading around, I never see any comments from you guys?

Anyways, enough with the excuses and all that – on with the show, right?
[*APPLAUSE*]

The point about this post is to inform about the problems with bogon IPv4 (and probably IPv6 too, I haven’t looked at that yet) prefixes being announced into the Internet, and the problem about Internet Service Providers accepting these prefixes and adds them to their routing table. The worst case scenario would be like spam from 127.0.0.1

But, what are bogons.. or bogon prefixes?
I am glad to be asked that question sometimes, it is good – it shows that someone paid attention.
Bogon prefixes are for example unassigned prefixes, or RFC1918 networks and there are also other reserved ranges.

The assignment process for IPv4 is somewhat like this:

  1. IANA allocates a block of IPv4 addresses to a Regional Internet Registry (usually /8 to i.e. RIPE)
  2. The RIR then makes suballocations of this block to a LIR, a LIR is a Local Internet Registry (i.e. your ISP)

The ISP can then announce this IPv4 prefix in the BGP table on the Internet.
All these IANA to RIR assignments are public information, you can find it at cymru.com, they have regular updates.

The problem with bogons
The problem exists when networks listed as RESERVED or UNALLOCATED in this list are being announced and produces internet traffic.
For example, if you want to send out totally anonymous spam, what could you possibly do to ISPs without proper filtering?
Yeah, you could see someone announcing 192.168.0.0/22 and start spamming from 192.168.1.0.

Do you keep track of every announcement ever done to you? (In that case, how do you do it?)
I run a quagga router which also sees all announcements to our network and logs these to a logfile, and I am insterested to hear about other solutions – I know there are some java based applications.

To be consistent; you do not want bogons announced to you, you do not want to accept bogon networks and start routing traffic to them.

How to fix?
There’s a bogons prefix-list that Team Cymru creates that is very useful for Cisco enthusiasts like me.
They have constructed a secure BGP template.

So let us hope maybe there’s at least one extra bogon filter in place tomorrow, and let me know about it!

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